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nelson man dela is in the hospital. a government statement said he was admitted in pretoria today to undergo test. they say he's doing well and the tests are routine for someone his age. he's 94 years old. we'll have a live report on his condition coming up in 20 minutes. >>> u.s. authorities are investigating whether a man detained in egypt played a role in the attacks on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. egyptian authorities have detained mohamed jamal abu ak med. he was removed from prison after the downfall of mubarak's regime. susan, what do we now know about the arrest of the alleged terror suspect? >> hi, joe. u.s. authorities are looking at whether this man involved in an egypt-based terror network is responsible for that attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi on september 11 according to a u.s. official with direct knowledge of the investigation. mohamed achmed was detained by egyptian authorities. the fbi which is conducting the investigation has not had access to him yet. following the attack he popped up on their radar. the official wouldn't comment on what led them to
. for every one dollar that the government collects, it spends 71 cents of it on the big four. the big four are medicare, medicaid, social security, and interest. just interest on the nation's dea debt. so that ain't pretty and i'm sorry to say it's not getting any prettier. in the next four years, those costs will eat up 100% of every dollar that the government collects. these are sad statistics from the government accountability office. no money for defense, nothing for education, food, safety, veterans, the whole shebang. it's basically in your own personal economy like spending every cent you earn on your mortgage and nothing else. no food,clothes, no car, you get the picture, right. the 20-year prediction is even more mind blowing. the big four is set to consume $1.21 for every $1 that you pay in in taxes, which brings us back to the cliff, the fiscal cliff, and how lawmakers can fix this very expensive problem. terry savage is the nationally syndicated financial columnist for the "chicago sun-times." terry, it's good of you to join us today. i think my first question is, with most hou
to get your kid in college, government pointed out computer systems analysts and related fields very strong demand. that fits in that professional business services. good pay in that field. let's talk about the breakdown of race. african-american unemployment went down a little bit. 13.2%. >> still way too high. >> notice the disparities between the worker groups are still a problem. structural problems there. but the african-american unemployment rate went down and that's the trend. we have two years and change now of -- month after month of solid jobs creation. >> march of 2010. >> that was -- march of 2010, that was -- census hiring. and stimulus. >> quick question. this is a bit of a -- i read this report this morning that there were 600,000 jobs that could not be filled -- more than half a million jobs that couldn't be filled across this country last year, i believe, because we just didn't have skilled enough workers. and the first thing i thought was because we are not teaching them sciences or computer or technology. much of it had to do with up can't even answer a phone. you
, the syrian government says the united states is trying to create fear and set the ground for an attack. secretary of state hillary clinton today met with russia's foreign minister twice today in dublin. these are important meetings because russia is a syrian ally and helped the country amass the chemical weapons it has. is it too late? national security contributor fran townsend is a member of the cia and homeland security external advisory board and colonel cedric layton is a member of the staffs. what are the consequences? is the u.s. going to passing the point of no return here? >> it is. the most recent information suggests they're actually preparing to be able to launch these warheads containing sarin gas and other chemical weapons. that's a problem, right? now a military strike could inadvertently trigger the dissemination of such weapons, what you have to do is get the intelligence to interrupt the decision cycle. get between assad and the individual who presses the button to launch that missile. that's a very big ask from the intelligence community and very difficult. that's th
the future of gay marriage throughout the entire united states. at issue is the federal government defense of marriage act that defines marriage as only the union between a man and woman and california's proposition 8 which banned gay marriage was overturned by an appeals court. cnn's crime and justice correspondent joe johns has been following both cases for us. joe, explain the impact of today's decision. >> well, it is big impact. as you know, this is one of those cases that people talk about over the water cooler. let's start with proposition 8. very simple, wolf, it is the california ballot initiative passed in 2008 by the people of the state of california that established marriage as between a man and a woman. it overturned a court case that said same sex couples have the right to marry. windsor is the other case you were talking about, it is an attack on defense of marriage act which was passed in 1996 by the congress, signed by the president. it's called windsor against the united states. it is about a woman named edith windsor who had a long time relationship with her partner, and
versus the federal government. you have colorado and washington saying we're going ahead with pot being a-okay, but it's a federal crime. what is the federal government going to do? could they shut it all down? >> reporter: this is the $64 billion question, what is the federal government going to do? the only thing thegsd so far is they're reviewing the laws in both states. they're going to sit back and see how they implement it and see where they can go from there. they reminded both states pot is illegal on the federal level. the concern is when you create havens of legal pot in colorado and here in washington state, and you have a black market around them, what's going to be the effect? are these going to be magnets for illegal pot? are you going to have problems on the border and lots of pot out there? it's not clear right now. they're waiting to see how it goes. >> thanks very much to miguel. appreciate it. miguel is talking about marijuana and it got us thinking about the war on drugs. it cost this country more than a trillion dollars since it was launched by president nixon as the
-poohing government's role in provision nutrition for kids. i shot back at her, we had a couple exchanges and finally i said why don't we both live on food stamps. i went to bed not thinking much of it and got up the next morning and it had spread through the social media world, and was a bigger story. i called my staff and said we're doing this. >> you were on day four of this. this is the exact pile of food that you got. >> yes. >> what is interesting to me, you spent $29.78 on this, but when we tried to match it around here, in new york, we had to spend $57.37. >> right. >> implying that the government rate, if you like, for this food is clearly based right at the lowest possible level and may not be even possible for many people onn efood stamps. >> that's what we want to highlight. you have people who live in nutrition and food deserts who don't have access to fresh, healthy foods. i'm very lucky, i live a mile away so i walked to the superintendent. many people can't get in their car and go to the supermarket. we're trying to see not just what the challenges are living on this amount of money,
fears that the government may unleash deadly chemical weapons on its own people. that means more lives could be lost, and for americans it means that the u.s. would probably take action. president obama, secretary of state clinton and defense secretary leon panetta have warned president bashar al assad that using chemical weapons crosses the red line. >> the world is watching. the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. >> so the question is what would that action look like? cnn pentagon correspondent barbara starr has a look. >> reporter: randi, for defense secretary leon panetta, the major priority now is to try to determine syria's intent. does it intend to use chemical weapons? with the u.s. now believing the syrian government has chemical weapon-filled bombs, cnn has learned the pentagon is secretly updating military strike options for president obama in the event he orders action. a senior u.s. official tells cnn a strike could be carried out with the ships and aircraft already stationed in the region. the planning is being driven by the latest intelligence
at something how much money we throw at it we'll august suggest more, more, more. >> government does such a good job tracking outcomes. >> let's track the outcomes of tax loopholes so if we're going to evaluate outcomes it's important to evaluate the outcomes of tax loopholes. >> how quickly will all this felt? say they have a deal three weeks into the new year, that doesn't help you if you're trying to run an agency budget because you've got to make plans for january 2nd. >> agencies were told to plan for the cuts, still don't think it should happen but we'll have plans in place in case they do. the omb and even federal agencies themselves can sort of postpone the impact of these cuts for at least a few weeks into the new year if we go over the cliff and if legislators are going to promise they are going to get a deal. so you may not feel these cuts at all. i should also say we don't know where the cuts are really going to come from because all we have are percentages per agentsy. it will affect a lot of things we talked about probably, but to the extent we can't say. >> this is som
of their money to the federal government without raising tax rates which we believe am harm our economy. >> one conservative in the senate is breaking ranks with his party over the whole idea of raising tax rates with the party. tom coburn told msnbc today he would be okay with doing what the president wants, raising taxes on the wealthy, as long as it is coupled with entitlement reform and spending cuts. the reason we're told is because he believes at this point it's better to do that to get what he and other republicans want long term, which is a fundamental overhaul of the tax code, perhaps they can get that if they give the president what he wants now. you remember, coburn was among the first republicans a couple years ago to say it was okay to raise revenue. now he appears to be the first senate republican to say he would be okay with raising rates as long as it's part of that package we described. >> a meeting or a phone call between john boehner and president obama, is that at all in the works? >> as far as we know, no. whether it's in the works, we could only hope, at this point we do n
not be conceding that the federal government needs more money, negotiating with ourselves, and treating the president's proposal like it's serious. >> very critical of john boehner. and demint's press release aimed squarely at john boehner. $800 billion tax hike will destroy jobs, allow washington to spend more. as you all know, john boehner put an $800 billion tax hike as a center of his proposal. so john boehner got rejected from the white house, which wants another $800 billion on top of that in tax hikes and then rejected by the right wing of his own party which wants absolutely no tax hikes at all. so unlike harry reid, i actually feel genuine sympathy for john boehner. so kudos, speaker, for showing deserters or desenters who is boss. boehner stripped house members who opposed key committee assignments today. and earlier i spoke with one republican leader in the house who himself has been out of step with boehner in recent days. deputy whip congressman tom cole of oklahoma. he said the gop should agree to obama's proposal to extend bush tax rates for households that make less than
going over the fiscal cliff. >> those three guys are here live. and the man who shut down the government under bill clinton. what newt gingrich thinks it will take to avoid that happening again. >>> plus one of my personal heroes, the fastest man in the history of planet earth. ja ma jamaican sprinter usain bolt revealing a talent you may not know he has. ♪ let's get together and feel all right ♪ >> this is "piers morgan tonight." >>> good evening. our big story tonight, you are so hot, america. i mean that literally. the temperature was a balmy 60 degrees this afternoon in new york just outside cnn's studios. the average high temperature in december is normally 43. a warm front has flooded the lower 48 states. quite extraordinary but is it evidence of man-made global warming? that's tonight's battleground america. joining me now, bill nye the science guy and mark morano, the publisher of climate depo.com. welcome to you both. let me start with you, mark, if i may. you are implacably opposed to the concept of man-made climate change. why? >> we followed the evidence. there are quite
. >> blankets hang across one alleyway to block government snipers' line of sight. the shooting is coming from there, the sniper, one of the fighters points out. they take us further forward. crawling through holes punched between buildings. they're just telling us that it's because of the snipers that they have to move through the various buildings like this. it's an urban version of first world war trenches. they etched forward by just one block. going any further is back breaking work. a rebel dashes down the street carrying a makeshift rocket launcher. it's a plastic tube. he later displays the rocket. this is a homemade rocket that was manufactured by the fighters themselves in this very battlefield. but they can't find the sand bags to stabilize the launcher. the weapons the fighters carry are spoils of war, captured from government forces, but they also make a promise. there is a message we have, one of the older fighters vows. when this is over, the guns will be handed over. i am just fighting to see my house down the road, he says. it's hard to fully absorb the scale of the devastatio
services, flip the screen guys, business and professional services, 43,000 of those. the government pointing out that computer systems analysts and related fields have strong demand and good pay there. every month, you're looking backward. the trend is important. two years now of jobs growth, but look at how difficult it has been to stay above 200,000 jobs per month. it gets up there one or two months, then can't quite stay up there. we need to see next year, some better jobs, durability of this for next year. >> this report was supposed to be weak. superstorm sandy, a number of labor disputes. the fiscal cliff. we were expecting the number to go up from 7.9 to 8%. went down to 7.7. a number of economists, created 146,000 jobs, so before you opine on the report, how accurate and reliable do you feel this report was? >> well, first of all, i think it's important to know there were downward revisions to the past two months, which makes the trend not look as good. it's also important to note that anywhere between 50 to 100,000, which about 86,000 were affected by the storm, is not cons
lobby has some legitimate points, but the laws that govern us and the steps we take ought to be geared toward the larger public good. there are obviously some people out there who have some apocalyptic vision that the federal government is going to lean toward tyranny and they're going to be holed up with their own munitions plant and they're going to resist it. i don't think people with that mindset ought to have undue influence on our government policy. >> thank you for coming in. brilliant analysis on what is a huge issue to me. >>> coming up, has the gop gone too far to the right? a former republican on why he has joined the democrats. charlie crist joins me next. check out my new treadmill app. pretty sweet, huh? cute. but don't you have any apps on your phone that can make your life easier? who do you think i am, quicken loans? at quicken loans, we'll provide you with myql mobile. this amazingly useful app allows you to take pictures of your mortgage documents using an iphone or android smart phone... so you can easily send them to us. one more way quicken loans is engineered to
atlanta. hala, first of all, you've got the syrian rebels, they're there fighting al assad's government. now the u.s. government, state department, steps in and says, a small faction of this group is considered a terrorist organization. what does that mean on the ground in syria for the rebel forces? >> well, it's hard to tell if it's going to mean anything, really. because what we're hearing now, uniformly from rebel groups on the ground after the designation by the united states of the nusra front as a foreign terrorist organization, look you can't not arm us, not finance us, and at the same time tell us not to rely on the best sort of armed and financed subgroup in the anti-assad fight. so rebel groups are saying you're putting us in a difficult position. they're having in some cases to rely on the jihadist group and its tactics reminiscent of what happened in iraq, suzanne, as you know with the car bombings and suicide bombings, in order to make battlefield gains. you saw nick paton walsh's pieces as well one of the most significant battleground advances, the reported occupation, i
, john says, you have here before you, the american government in exile. >> by the time this interview is over, you will know why they both lost. >> what is known about the three of you is you're very close friends. i sort of represent an air or an essence of bipartisanship and genuine cross-party friendship, which many feel doesn't really exist in modern-day washington. how have you managed to do this? and why can't more of your colleagues do this? >> respect, affection, traveling together. when you travel together -- and by the way, other senators have described our travel as death marches. we go to exotic places like afghanistan and baghdad and libya and those really fun places. but i think traveling together is probably been for years now we've traveled to the most interesting places, maybe not the most fun places. and so we become friends that way. here in the senate. therefore, we have worked together on a lot of national security issues. lindsay is a reserve colonel in the air force. he serves his active duty for years in iraq, now afghanistan. joe being a key member of the home
, and has been cause for concern before. not only because the government there might use it, but also because many of these weapons could fall into the hands of terrorists. precisely what are we talking about? first of all, mustard gas. this is an old chemical weapon. it was used in world war i. it doesn't act very quickly, but it's extremely painful. it burns the skin. it can burn the eyes, and when inhaled, it burns the lungs. it can be fatal, but more often is t simply renders an opponent unable to fight anymore, and it can create chronic health problems, like respiratory illness and blindness for the remainder of life for some of the people who are exposed to it. beyond that, let's look at some of the other ideas here. sarin gas is one of the concerns out there. sarin gas attacks the nervous system, and in even small amounts it can cause uncontrolled trembling, then convulsions, then unconsciousness and death. beyond that, there's even concern that they might have vx gas. some scientists consider this one of the most dangerous chemicals on the planet. it was originally developed a
has carried out the launch of a long range rocket. that come from the south korean government. and the japanese government also told cnn that the rocket passed over the island of okinawa, though no action was taken by them to shoot it down. the news comes as a surprise because north korea announced on monday that it was going to extend the launch window into late december. you can stay with cnn throughout the night for the latest on these two breaking stories. pierce morgan is in washington, d.c., with a special interview. >> welcome to the senate committee on foreign relations. this is where some of the most sense sensitive global issues are discussed. tonight i'm sitting down with three legendary citizens, john mccain senior senator from arizona, presidential candidate and ranking member on the armed services committee, joe lieberman, senior senator from connecticut and was on the ticket with al gore, and lindsey graham, the senior senator from south carolina, a member of the armed services appropriations and budget committees. welcome the you three. the three amigos. as dub
a trillion dollars. every u.s. household will start giving the government another 2 to $3,500 a year. 90% of us will see our taxes going up. but up to $110 billion in across the board cuts in government spending will also kick in. half of the cuts, about $55 billion, comes from the defense budget. the other 55 billion come from nondefense programs, like health care, education, housing assistance. our chief political analyst gloria borger has been looking at all of these numbers. the dire consequences of going over the cliff, is it enough to force a deal? >> no. and that's what is sort of striking about it. when you talk to some liberal democrat, they actually say, you know what, maybe it's better to go off the cliff because you get the defense spending cuts that dana was talking about and the tax cuts for the wealthy expire. you can always restore the tax cuts for the middle class. she talked to some republicans, they say a bad deal is not what we want. they don't want any deal. and then, of course, you talk to the american public as we keep doing here. and the american public, take a lo
. it was talking about the power of the government not to take away guns from a well-regulated militia. everyone should exercise personal responsibility, by refusing to have a gun in their home. not putting their children at risk of suicide or murder. yes, people should be punished but we shouldn't encourage criminal conduct by having guns at flea markets to criminals and felons and anybody that wants to own a gun. if this football player hadn't had a gun there would be two people alive today not dead. >> that is not true. if he wanted to kill somebody, there are plenty of weapons including his fist, a car, a bomb that can do it. if you take away the gun, that intention is still there. >> but it's a fleeting intention. it lasts a minute. and if you have a gun, it takes only a second. >> it's a fleeting -- you are putting the word -- >> to carole's point. it is people that kill people. i think it is important to make sure. >> it is people with guns who kill people. >> no. let's talk about in england. >> we're moving on. there's a lot to cover here. this debate will rage again because there will b
the civil war, world war i, world war ii. it grants the president and federal government extraordinary authorities, effectively extends civil liberties for anyone the government deems an enemy and keeps us in a permanent war footing in all kinds of ways. end this situation should be something that would appeal to both left and right. james madison, the author of the constitution, was clear on this topic. of all the enemies to public enemy, he wrote war is the most draw might because it comprises and develops the germ of in other. of all the enemies to public lynn earth war is perhaps the most directed because it compromise and develops the germ of err other. war is the parent of armies. in addition we have had the largest expansion of the federal government since world war ii. dana priest and will yaj arkin have documented that the u.s. government has built 33 new building complexes for the intelligence bureaucracies alone, occupying 17 million square feet, the equivalent of 22 u.s. capitals or three pentagons. the department of homeland security itself employs almost one quarter of a
in such a situation. longer than the civil war, world war i, world war ii, it grants the government extraordinary authorities and effectively suspends civil liberties for anyone the government deems the minute and also keeps us at a permanent war feeting in all kinds of ways, endsing this situation should be something that -- james madison the author of the constitution was clear on this topic. of all the enemies to public liberty, he wrote, war is perhaps the most to be dreaded because it comprises and develops the germ of every other. war is the parent of armies from these proceed deaths and taxes. no nation could preserve its freedom in the midst of continual warfare. if you want to know buy we're in such a deep budget tear hole, keep in mind that we have spend about $2 trillion on foreign wars in the last decade. and we have the largest government since world war ii. the u.s. government has built 33 new building complexes for the intelligence bureaucracies alone occupies 17 million square feet, the equivalent of 70 u.s. capitals or three u.s. pentagons. of course there are real threats out th
that the government would consider releasing his name, but not his connection perhaps to anything that might have had to do with osama bin laden's assassination, right? >> correct. we know from a u.s. official, it was told to us that he was a member of the naval special war fair development group. s.e.a.l. team six. a very elite unit, but we are not being told whether he was actually part of that smaller team that actually went into the bin laden compound and took out osama bin laden. we do expect that the navy will release the name of this fallen hero sometime later today. they probably will not name his exact unit. >> all right. thanks. chris lawrence live for us at the pent dpon this morning. thank you. >> yeah. really? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms, plus it relieves your runny nose. [ breathes deeply ] awesome. [ male announcer ] yes, it is. that's the cold truth! it's lots of things. all waking up. ♪ becoming part of the global phenomenon we call the internet of everything. ♪ trees will talk to networks will talk to scientists about climate change. cars
: the big question still what will the federal government do. pot still illegal federally burning here and soon in colorado. >> so miguel, you just mentioned that there could be this boom in tax revenue if they tax it at 25%. i don't understand how that will work because today you can't buy it, you can't sell it and you can't grow it legally. how can you tax it? >> reporter: that's the huge piece that needs to be worked out by the washington state bureau of liquor that's going to run all of this just like they regulate liquor sales, they're going to regulate marijuana sales. they're going to license and tax the growing, the processing and retail sales for all marijuana all at 25% plus fees for every individual that goes into those various businesses. they project that in the first five years nearly $2 billion from this program alone. >> and then this is not the only state because during this federal election there were two states that ended up on positive end of legalizing recreational marijuana. the other one being colorado. why do we not see a party there today? >> reporter: because
. >> it certainly is. the problem is though, this is all states rights versus the federal government. but it's still a federal crime, so what's the federal government going to do? could they shut it all down? >> this is the $64 billion question. what is the federal government going to do. the only thing they've said is they're reviewing the laws, they're going to sit back and see how they are implemented and see where they can go from there. they've reminded both states pot is still illegal. i think the concern is when you create these havens of legal pot in colorado and here in washington state and have a black market around them, what's going on the effect? are these going to be magnets for illegal pot? are you going to have problems on the border a? it's not clear. they're waiting and seeing how this goes. >> thanks very much to miguel. miguel's talking about marijuana and it got us thinking about the war on drugs. it's cost this country more than a trillion dollars since it was launched by president nixon as the war on drugs 40 years aerks but the effort is being dubbed a failure and waste of mo
accountable. >> syria appears to be at a turning point. there are reports of the government preparing chemical weapons. the rebels securing the airport and more than 40,000 people dead. now some high profile senators are saying that we may have passed the point of no return. that's our focus this morning. when is enough enough? and yesterday i asked that question to a witness of some of the worst humanitarian crises in generations. cnn chief international correspondent christiane amanpour. she's also global affairs anchor for abc news. thank you so much for joining us. i want to start by playing a very famous clip of you speaking to then president bill clinton back in 1994 about the bosnian war, which at that point was going into its third year and had claimed tens of thousands of lives. >> as leader of the free world, as leader of the only superpower, why has it taken you, the united states, so long to articulate a policy on bosnia? why in the absence of a policy have you allowed the u.s. and the west to be held hostage to those who do have a clear policy, the bosnian serbs, and do you not th
don't worry about it. >> i know the sourt korean government is alarmed about what is going on. even if the south korean troops go on a high alert, how does that impact the nearly 30,000 soldiers along the dmz? >> there are troops throughout the northern part of south korea and even further back into south korea. we are told always that they are at a high state of alert. the intelligence assets remain on station 24 hours a day because of the assumption that north korea could order its ground troops across the dmz or start firing some day with the long-range artillery. they could keep it in north korea and fire well into south korea. so all of this is the constant concern this missile test only raises it, wolf. >>> nato today confirmed the dangerous he is c dangerous escalation, another one, in syria civil war. they describe it as scud-type missiles inside syria this week. missiles aimed at civilian populations controlled by the rebels. let's go to our foreign affairs correspondent jill dougherty. what are you learning, jill? >> well, u.s. military satellites are tracking those missil
. and another provision of the treaty that can be read to obligate the united states government to pay for abortion services. >> you are just interpreting things. it doesn't -- it never uses the word abortion. it basically says on -- that disabled people should have the same access to health care that other people have. that nondisabled people have overseas. again, we're talking about overseas. >> it does refer to reproductive rights and reproductive rights in this context has been interpreted to include abortion. and this is an -- >> interpreted by you. >> yes, and a number of other people who have looked at it as well. so the point is that if this does mean something, and if it could mean something that could impact u.s. law -- >> but this treaty states, it's not self-executing. and the u.s. supreme court has said that a nonself-executing treaty doesn't create obligations that can be enforced in u.s. federal courts. >> the fact that it may be nonself-executing, anderson, doesn't mean it doesn't have any impact at all. it just means you may not be able to bring a lawsuit arising under
taxess and lower entitleme entitlements, government spending, it reduces economic growth, and it will. it just depends on how slowly or quickly you do it. if you do it quickly, it's a cliff. if you do it slowly, you drift down in a parachute. it seems to me the $16 trillion as opposed to the $4 trillion, that our entitlements are so significant, medicare, medicaid, social security going forward, based upon the aging of the boomers, primarily, that number is so significant at some point two or three or four years down the road, we'll be back at it in terms of cutting entitlements and raising taxes. we have a significant grand canyon. >> if we do $4 trillion which again is very optimistic, that's a band aid or a small down payment? >> i think so. there's no doubt that will calm markets, that, you know, positive enthusiasts will look to that in terms of higher stock prices and higher economic growth in the short term, but ultimately, this drag, this fiscal drag is a significant force based upon reducing entitlements over the next 10, 15, 20 years, and we're going to have to address it at
trillion cut would be a small down payment on our problem. >>> the government is working closely with rebel groups in syria. but now one of the groups is going to be designated a terrorist group with ties to al qaeda. >>> plus, the u.s. postal service loses $25 million every single day. could this holiday season be the last for the usps? >>> and mexican-american singer jenni rivera confirmed as one of those killed in a plane crash. we'll look at her final moments in legacy, "outfront." [ female announcer ] what if the next big thing, isn't a thing at all? it's lots of things. all waking up. ♪ becoming part of the global phenomenon we call the internet of everything. ♪ trees will talk to networks will talk to scientists about climate change. cars will talk to road sensors will talk to stoplights about traffic efficiency. the ambulance will talk to patient records will talk to doctors about saving lives. it's going to be amazing. and exciting. and maybe, most remarkably, not that far away. the next big thing? we're going to wake the world up. ♪ and watch, with eyes wide, as it gets to w
the government, but soon they could face a weapon even deadlier than any they've seen so far. cnn's pentagon correspondent barbara starr is joining us with the latest new threat on the possible use of chemical weapons. >> reporter: wolf, the challenge is for the obama administration to figure out exactly what bashar al assad is up to with his deadly arsenal. the horror remains unspeakable. 25 years ago saddam hussein unleashed one of the worst poison gas attacks in history. thousands were killed. now, in syria, u.s. concerns are growing by the hour that bashar al assad may be planning the same thing against his citizens. >> the intelligence that we have raises serious concerns that this is being considered. >> reporter: u.s. intelligence shows syria has mixed chemical compounds needed to make a deadly agent that can quickly kill thousands. >> the united states and our allies are facing the prospect of an imminent use of weapons of mass destruction in syria. and this may be the last warning we get. >> reporter: the u.s. is not precisely saying what the syrians are doing, but there are two way
to act as a bonafide government. several recognize the opposition fighters as the people's true representatives. >> the syrian opposition coalition is inclusive enough and representative enough of the syrian population that we consider them the legitimate representative of the syrian people in opposition to the assad regime. >> we want to bring in holly from cnn international. what does that mean exactly when he's recognizing now the opposition as the true, legitimate representatives of the people who are there? >> essentially, it's what he said. al assad is not the representative of the syrian people. the u.s. and other than western countries have called on bashar al assad to step down. concretely it is a diplomatic move. it was expected. what it doesn't change and this is what the rebels and the opposition want is whether or not they get more money and more arms. they're saying in their meeting with the friends of morocco group, friends of syria group in morocco right now. they say recognition is fine, but we want weapons and more money. right now they're not getting it from t
organization. u.s. government documents indicate the radical group, known as the al nursa front has ties to al qaeda. they'll be labeled as terrorists tomorrow. the same rebel fighters are believed to be playing a part in the iraqi insurgency. these documents show that secretary of state hillary clinton signed these papers making the declaration official, back on the 20th of last month. much more on this story out of syria next hour. >>> an american doctor kidnapped in afghanistan and what happens next involves around the clock negotiations and a dramatic act of courage by s.e.a.l. team six. i'm brooke baldwin. the news is now. the death of a pop star. ♪ a picture shows what happened moments before jenni rivera's plane crashed. plus, boys disappear from a reform school and are never heard from again. >> these are children who came here and died for one reason or another and quite literally have been lost in the woods. >> the answers may lie in this cemetery. and one governor floating the idea of setting tuition rates based upon your major. this may change college forever. americans believe t
government says it shows just how desperate assad's regime is now getting. >>> and also, our first look at the shooter who police believe is responsible for last night's deadly rampage in a portland-area mall. police have identified him as well as the two people that he killed. let's go "outfront." >>> good evening, everyone. i'm ashleigh banfield in for erin burnett tonight who is on assignment in afghanistan. we've got breaking news right off the top. cnn just learning that the united states does not believe that north korea is in full control of that satellite that it sent into space with the long-range rocket launch. this is according to a u.s. official to our barbara starr at the pentagon. up until now, by most accounts, this launch has been seen as a success, or certainly it raised the bar on how we view their capabilities. erin burnett spoke with defense secretary leon panetta, exclusively in kabul about this very issue. take a look. >> mr. secretary, thank you so much for taking the time. >> good to be with you, erin. >> i wanted to start by asking you about north korea. i know,
government could use this constitution and deny them their rights. the president says the constitution is out there for everyone to see. if you don't like it, go vote no. >> that's what they all say. we all know how that's going to be. >> he is going to leave wresh is not our president anymore. >> if he continues like this, we are going to wait in the streets until he go out. >> reporter: opposition factions sounding as defiant as ever, rejecting the president's position who has tried to calm them down by trying to assure them that there is no plot by the muslim brotherhood to monopolize power and according to the president, the best way to solve this is for egyptians to go out on december 15th and vote. obviously, many of these opposition factions don't trust them. around 10:00 p.m. everyone started to go home, and now the question, will they be back tomorrow and the next day, and what options do they have beyond protesting? >> we've got reza on the phone in cairo. first of all, what are you seeing now? what is taking place? the sun is down, and obviously, people are taking to the streets ag
will the federal government do? pot still illegal federally. today, a legal toke of revolution burning here and soon colorado. now, colorado's law, almost the exact same, will get going by january 5th. and the federal government has only said so far that they are reviewing both states' programs and they remind them that federally, at least, it is still illegal to possess marijuana. back to you. >> miguel marquez for us this morning, thanks, miguel. let's get right to alan st. pierre, he's in washington, d.c., the executive director for the group fighting for the legalization of marijuana since they were founded back in 1972. nice to have you with us. you heard miguel's report. there are strict rules, it's going to be heavily taxed, still considered to be illegal by the feds. what's your reaction to what happened at the stroke of midnight? >> well, that's a celebration to be sure. that's pent-up 75 years of marijuana prohibition in america, even though the law technically doesn't allow for public use. let's acknowledge it was just a public celebration. >> so if you think that this is the end
going on right now? >> the local government right now is on its search and retrieval operation. however, there are just some areas which are very difficult to reach because at this time, the roads are destroyed. however, the local government is speeding up their search and rescue and retrieval operations in this area, and also, one mission with the local government and other partners with the area can provide for the survivors. >> you are part of a response team. and we know that in crises like this, it's the responders who have personal challenges of their own. how are the responders reacting to this and coping with it all? >> yeah, actually, working in the humanitarian aid or working emergency response is really a tough job. it's really difficult to see the people's faces where they are very emotion al. there were those who were crying. you know, what makes me feel right now is to do whatever i can do, do the best i can do in order to serve the people, to be able to help with the people who are in need. that's the best thing that you can see them somehow, when world vision came into t
are not spending, what we need is for government to be the spender of last resort. we don't want to go into major spending cuts. that's the austerity trap that europe has found itself in, and it would be crazy for us to go in that direction. >> before we go, very quickly, yes or no. do we have a deal by the end of the year? >> yes. >> and what about you, doug? >> marginally, yes. 60/40 in favor of a deal but they've got to get moving. >> we'll have to see if it's a real deal or another kick of the can down the road or some other interim thing. thanks for being here. >>> "outfront" next, the u.s. military draws up new plans for a potential strike against syria as we learn more about that country's stockpile of chemical weapons. >>> plus -- the u.s. supreme court agrees to take on the issue of gay marriage. and is that a signal, is that a signal that for republicans, it may be time to reconsider its view on this? >>> and a nurse duped by a prank call leaking information about the duchess of cambridge is found dead. all of that coming up. [ female announcer ] research suggests cell health plays a ke
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